Krueger and Associates, P.A. - Certified Public Accountants
Tampa, Florida
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Taxpayers received about $659 million in refunds during fiscal year 2023, representing a 2.7 percent increase in the amount of refunded to taxpayers in the previous fiscal year.


The IRS announced that final regulations related to required minimum distributions (RMDs) under Code Sec. 401(a)(9) will apply no earlier than the 2025 distribution calendar year. In addition, the IRS has provided transition relief for 2024 for certain distributions made to designated beneficiaries under the 10-year rule. The transition relief extends similar relief granted in 2021, 2022, and 2023.


The IRS, in connection with other agencies, have issued final rules amending the definition of "short term, limited duration insurance" (STLDI), and adding a notice requirement to fixed indemnity excepted benefits coverage, in an effort to better distinguish the two from comprehensive coverage.


The Tax Court has ruled against the IRS's denial of a conservation easement deduction by declaring a Treasury regulation to be invalid under the enactment requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).


For purposes of the energy investment credit, the IRS released 2024 application and allocation procedures for the environmental justice solar and wind capacity limitation under the low-income communities bonus credit program. Many of the procedures reiterate the rules in Reg. §1.48(e)-1 and Rev. Proc. 2023-27, but some special rules are also provided.


The IRS has provided a limited waiver of the addition to tax under Code Sec. 6655 for underpayments of estimated income tax related to application of the corporate alternative minimum tax (CAMT), as amended by the Inflation Reduction Act (P.L. 117-169).


The IRS has issued proposed regulations that would provide guidance on the application of the new excise tax on repurchases of corporate stock made after December 31, 2022 (NPRM REG-115710-22). Another set of proposed rules would provide guidance on the procedure and administration for the excise tax (NPRM REG-118499-23).


Before the fast-approaching new year, it’s important to take some time and reflect on year-end tax planning. The weeks pass quickly and the arrival of January 1, 2015 will close the doors to some tax planning strategies and opportunities. Fortunately, there is still time for a careful review of your year-end tax planning strategy.


Taxpayers will receive some modest relief for the 2015 tax year, thanks to the mandatory annual inflation-adjustments provided under the Tax Code. When there is inflation, indexing of brackets lowers tax bills by including more of people’s incomes in lower brackets—for example by placing taxpayers’ income in the existing 15-percent bracket, rather than the existing 25-percent bracket.


As January 1, 2015 draws closer, many employers are gearing up for the “employer mandate” under the Affordable Care Act. For 2015, there is special transition relief for mid-size employers. Small employers (employers with fewer than 50 full-time employees, including full-time equivalent employees) are always exempt from the employer mandate and related employer reporting.


Every year the IRS publishes a list of projects that are currently on its agenda. For example, the IRS may indicate through this list that it is working on a new set of procedures relating to claiming business expenses. The new 2014–2015 IRS Priority Guidance Plan, just released this September, has indicated that IRS is working on guidance relating to whether employer-provided meals offered on company premises are taxable as income to the employee. In the Priority Guidance Plan’s Employee Benefits Section B.3, the IRS listed: "Guidance under §§119 and 132 regarding employer-provided meals" in its list of projects for the upcoming year.


Under the modified accelerated cost recovery system (MACRS) (which is more commonly known as depreciation), a half-year timing (i.e., averaging) convention generally applies to the depreciation deduction for most assets during anytime within the year in which they are purchased. That is, whether you purchase a business asset in January or in December, it’s treated for depreciation purposes as being purchased on July 1st. However, a taxpayer who places more than 40 percent of its depreciable property (excluding residential rental property and nonresidential real property) into service during the last three months of the tax year must use a mid-quarter convention – decidedly less advantageous. Because of the 40 percent rule, the purchase of a vehicle or other equipment in the last month of the tax year might, in itself, trigger imposition of the mid-quarter convention. Businesses should keep in mind the 40 percent rule especially for year-end tax planning purposes.


As an individual or business, it is your responsibility to be aware of and to meet your tax filing/reporting deadlines. This calendar summarizes important tax reporting and filing data for individuals, businesses and other taxpayers for the month of October 2014.


Since passage of the Affordable Care Act, several key requirements for employers have been delayed, including reporting of health coverage offered to employees, known as Code Sec. 6056 reporting. As 2015 nears, and the prospects of further delay appear unlikely, employers and the IRS are preparing for the filing of these new information returns.


As the 2015 filing season approaches, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen is bracing taxpayers for more reductions in customer service unless the agency receives more funding. According to Koskinen, the IRS is facing its biggest challenge in recent years. Koskinen, who spoke at the annual conference of the National Society of Accountants in August, also predicted that taxpayers will have to wait until after the November elections to learn the fate of many popular but expired tax incentives.


Life expectancies for many Americans have increased to such an extent that most taxpayers who retire at age 65 expect to live for another 20 years or more. Several years ago, a number of insurance companies began to offer a new financial product, often called the longevity annuity or deferred income annuity, which requires upfront payment of a premium in exchange for a guarantee of a certain amount of fixed income starting after the purchaser reaches age 80 or 85. Despite the wisdom behind the longevity annuity, this new type of product did not sell especially well, principally for tax reasons. These roadblocks, however, have largely been removed by new regulations.